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#GagosianSpotlight | #SarahSze: “I often remember a whole film through a single moment—one still image. One that stands out for me in the string of single frames without the infinitesimal shifts between that make a picture magically appear to move in a cinematic flow of time.”
—Sarah Sze
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#VoyagerGoldenRecord #EtienneJulesMaray #NewYorkerMag #DavidBowie #SpaceOddity #Gagosian #PigeonsInFlight #GagosianSpotlight #GagosianArtistEye #ArtistTakeover @newyorkermag
(1, 3) Sarah Sze, “Plein Air (Times Zero),” 2020 (detail) © Sarah Sze; (1) audio: David Bowie, “Space Oddity,” 1969; (2) Étienne-Jules Marey, Georges Demenÿ, "Pigeons en vol (Pigeons in flight)," 24 frames, Station Physiologique, 1891–92; (3) audio: Voyager Golden Record, “Men's house song,” 1977; and found sounds from Sze Studio, 2020
#GagosianSpotlight | #SarahSze: “These paintings are very portal-like. I see them as portals into space, into architecture, into the mind.”
—Sarah Sze

Above is the painting “Ripple” in Sarah Sze’s studio. Sze positioned the painting so it is viewed through a portal—from a dark room into light—as she had planned to do in the gallery at Gagosian, Paris.
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#TajMahal #MumtazMahal #Agra #India #Gagosian #GagosianArtistEye #ArtistTakeover
(1, 3) Sarah Sze, “Ripple (Times Zero),” 2020 © Sarah Sze; (2) Taj Mahal, Agra, India; audio: Sze Studio
#GagosianSpotlight | #SarahSze: On the eve of Sarah Sze’s exhibition opening at Gagosian, Paris, the city was shut down. While her artworks wait in galleries temporarily closed to the public, Gagosian has collaborated closely with Sze on an Instagram takeover to bring her ideas to a global audience.

In the coming days, Sze will be sharing images of each work in the show, alongside a rich weave of material that has influenced her, from videos to music, books to historical artworks. These posts offer insights into her practice and process, possibly harder to communicate from the gallery floor. Keep an eye out for upcoming posts.
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#Gagosian #Paris #GagosianArtistEye #ArtistTakeover #BillieEilish
(1) Sarah Sze, “Poke (Times Zero),” 2020 © Sarah Sze; (2) Boulevard Saint-Germain, Paris; audio: Billie Eilish, “ilomilo,” 2019
#GagosianSpotlight: New York–based artist Sarah Sze kicks off our new Artist Spotlight series—a multifaceted online program that highlights individual artists, one week at a time, who had exhibitions affected by the health crisis.

A peerless bricoleur, Sze gleans objects and images from worlds both physical and digital, assembling them into complex multimedia installations that prompt microscopic observation while evoking a macroscopic perspective on the infinite. In recent years she has returned to painting—the medium in which she first trained—producing works that translate her processes of sculptural accumulation into the making of collaged paintings that are detailed, dynamic, and highly textural.

This week, we will unveil a rich weave of features—including videos, interviews, essays, film lists, and more—to provide engaging insights into Sze’s artistic practice and process, inspirations and influences. On Friday at 6am EDT, the gallery will present a single artwork by Sze exclusively on the Gagosian we
#GagosianQuarterly: Visit "Gagosian Quarterly" to read Brice Marden's conversation with Gideon Lester about his collaboration on “Four Quartets,” a dance commission based on T. S. Eliot’s modernist masterpiece, with choreography by Pam Tanowitz and music by Kaija Saariaho. Follow the link in our bio.
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#BriceMarden #Gagosian 
Premiere of “Four Quartets” at the Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, July 6–8, 2018. Photo: Maria Baranova
In response to the catastrophic situation artists and art organizations face in the wake of the COVID-19 epidemic, the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation has announced a $5 million commitment to relief funding over the next three years. Building on its commitment to supporting artists and art institutions, this multiyear initiative marks the Foundation’s largest commitment of funding to date in support of a single cause since it became active in 2013.
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#HelenFrankenthaler #Gagosian @helenfrankenthalerfoundation
Helen Frankenthaler, “Ocean Drive West #1,” 1974 © 2020 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo by Tim Pyle, courtesy Helen Frankenthaler Foundation
#GagosianQuarterly: "What do you get when you cross a master choreographer, a luminary painter, and a virtuoso composer with a legendary poet?"
—Gillian Jakab

In a recent "Gagosian Quarterly" feature, Gillian Jakab examines the legacy of Sergei Diaghilev and the Ballets Russes in light of contemporary collaborations between visual artists and choreographers. Read the article via the link in our bio. 
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#Gagosian
Efimov and Woizikovski of Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes performing in Igor Stravinsky’s Renard (The Fox, 1916), with costumes by Mikhail Larionov and set design by Natalia Goncharova, July 16, 1929. Photo: Sasha/Stringer/Getty Images
#GagosianQuarterly: As part of our Weekly Reading series, we will be sharing articles and videos centred around different art forms. This week, the features will be focused on the theme of dance. Keep an eye out for upcoming posts.

For the Summer 2017 issue of “Gagosian Quarterly,” Nancy Dalva interviewed Howard Hodgkin in Berkeley, California, at the premiere of the Mark Morris Dance Group’s “Layla and Majnun,” on which he had been a crucial collaborator. Follow the link in our bio to read the feature online.
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#HowardHodgkin #MarkMorris #Gagosian “Layla and Majnun,” performed at Zellerbach Hall, University of California, Berkeley, 2016. Photos: Susana Millman
#StayHome: From his action-based works of the 1970s to the jaw-dropping technical feats of his later sculptures, Chris Burden consistently challenged his mental and physical limitations, reflecting on the surreal and precarious realities of contemporary life. Burden was interested in the staging of spectacle and the ways in which art could complicate one’s understanding of the material world.

In his 1972 work “Bed Piece,” Burden placed a single bed in the gallery space of 72 Market Street in Venice, California, and lived in it for twenty-two days, turning a usually private object into a public stage. Read more about Burden's work via the link in our bio. 
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#ChrisBurden #Gagosian 
Chris Burden, "Bed Piece," 1972. Performance at 72 Market Street, Venice, California, February 18–10, 1972 © Chris Burden/Licensed by the Chris Burden Estate and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
#GagosianSpotlight: As arts institutions worldwide temporarily close their doors to support efforts to contain the COVID-19 pandemic, exhibitions everywhere are being canceled, postponed, or curtailed. For artists who have invested time, energy, and resources preparing shows now directly affected by the health crisis, Gagosian is launching Artist Spotlight—a new, multifaceted program that invites individual artists to use the gallery’s online channels as an open platform, to present their work to the world and continue generating support for their studios.

Starting this Wednesday, Gagosian will highlight a single artist each week, unveiling a rich weave of editorial features—including videos, interviews, essays, artists’ playlists, and more. Each Friday at 6am EDT, the gallery will present a single artwork exclusively on the Gagosian website, making it available with pricing information for forty-eight hours only.

The featured artists include Sarah Sze, Stanley Whitney, Jennifer Guidi, Roe Ethridge, Titus K
#GagosianQuarterly: Looking for films to add to your watch list? From "Kids" to "Mister Lonely," Harmony Korine has continually revolutionized the art of cinema. In a wide-ranging discussion with film critic Emmanuel Burdeau, Korine reflects on the rewards and challenges of filmmaking and reveals what’s in store for the future. Read the piece on "Gagosian Quarterly" via the link in our bio. 
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#HarmonyKorine #Gagosian
Stills from "Mister Lonely," 2007, directed by Harmony Korine
#FromTheArchive: "In 2005 Gagosian presented a new series of paintings by Cy Twombly titled 'Bacchus.' The show was hosted in New York, in the uptown gallery where I have always worked. This first moment of seeing these paintings is one I will never forget. The paintings filled the space completely, Cy had painted the show specifically for that space and the canvases filled the room so precisely that they had to be transported rolled and later stretched inside the gallery.

The vibrant red color immediately jumped off the fleshy ground and out at the viewer. It spilled onto the pale wooden floor. An intense energy poured out of the paintings, it felt both like a jubilant celebration and a bloody scene you might encounter in the aftermath of a war. The walls radiated. It engulfed anyone who entered."
—Alison McDonald, Director of Publications, Gagosian

Over the coming weeks, Gagosian staff will be sharing their most memorable exhibitions and moments in the gallery's history. Keep an eye out for upcoming posts
#StayHome: Inspired by New York's light, architecture, and perpetual state of flux, Vera Lutter turned to photography in the early 1990s as a means to record the continuously changing cityscape. To capture an immediate and direct imprint of her surroundings, she transformed her own apartment into a large pinhole camera, employing the space that contained her personal experience as the apparatus that would document it. Modifying shipping containers and empty rooms to create site-specific camera obscuras, Lutter has since applied her technique to subjects across the world.

New York, where Lutter lives and works, is a returning subject for the artist. Visit "Gagosian Quarterly" via the link in our bio to read an interview with the artist from 2015, in which she discusses her relationship with the city.
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#VeraLutter #Gagosian @veralutterstudio 
Vera Lutter, “Chrysler Building: June 14, 2014," 2014 © Vera Lutter
Happy birthday to Giuseppe Penone, who was born on this day, April 3, in Garessio, Italy.

Throughout his fifty-year career, Penone has employed a wide range of materials and forms in an exploration of the fundamental language of sculpture. A protagonist of Arte Povera, Penone investigates respiration, growth, and aging—among other involuntary processes—to create an expansive body of work including sculpture, performance, works on paper, and photography.

Follow the link in our bio to watch "Gagosian Quarterly" videos about Penone’s recent exhibition at Gagosian, San Francisco, and his current outdoor installation at Fort Mason in San Francisco. 
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#GiuseppePenone #Gagosian #GagosianQuarterly
(1) Giuseppe Penone with "Spazio di luce (Space of Light)" (2008) in his studio, Turin, Italy, 2016. Photo: Angela Moore; (2) Installation view, "Giuseppe Penone at Fort Mason," Fort Mason, San Francisco, October 24, 2019–October 25, 2020; (3) Giuseppe Penone, “Anatomia 9,” 2015; Artwork © Giuseppe Penone, Artis
#GagosianQuarterly: Experimenting with temporal manipulation in his films and videos, Douglas Gordon uses both his own work and that of others as raw material to distort time, disorient, and challenge the viewer.

In 1995, Gordon developed the film “5 Year Drive-By,” which draws out John Ford’s legendary 1956 Western “The Searchers” to match the duration of the search referenced in the film’s story. It sets up a real-time experience of the time frame the film depicts. In this instance, one second of cinema time equates to 6.46 hours in real time, or an incredible three frames per hour, meaning that even the most dedicated of viewers is unlikely to ever see more than a few seconds of the original film. Follow the link in our bio to read more about Gordon's work on "Gagosian Quarterly."
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#DouglasGordon #Gagosian
Douglas Gordon, "5 Year Drive-By," 1995, single projection work, 5 years, loop © Studio lost but found/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2018. Photo: Kay Pallister
#StayHome: “‘Summer Afternoons’ was based on a couple of personal memories of a particular place, which was a replica of a real place I once lived in. Its character came back to me and that meaning or mood was worth investigating."
—Jeff Wall

Jeff Wall’s 2013 diptych, “Summer Afternoons,” was included in his first exhibition with the gallery last year at Gagosian, West 21st Street, New York. Visit "Gagosian Quarterly" via the link in our bio to read an interview with David Rimanelli in which Wall discusses his works, the physicality of photography, and the persistence of certain motifs throughout his career.
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#JeffWall #GagosianQuarterly #Gagosian
Jeff Wall, "Summer Afternoons," 2013 © Jeff Wall
#GagosianQuarterly: Guitarist and legendary composer Marc Ribot and acclaimed percussionist Billy Martin spoke with Brett Littman, the director of the Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, for a “Gagosian Quarterly” feature back in 2018. They discuss how they met, New York in the 1980s, and the way the visual arts have informed their music. Follow the link in our bio to read the conversation.

Over the last few days, we've been sharing content on an art form that many of us have turned to in recent weeks: music. Keep an eye out for the next series!
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#MarcRibot #BillyMartin #Gagosian 
Billy Martin. Photo: Saito Ogata
#StayHome: Looking for something to read from home? Browse the titles that can be found in Edmund de Waal’s “library of exile” online via the link in our bio. The catalogue lists over two thousand books written by exiled authors from Ovid’s time to the present day.

De Waal’s “library of exile” installation went on view earlier this month at London’s British Museum. The small library houses copies of these books alongside a quartet of de Waal’s large-scale vitrines, containing porcelain vessels and page-like brackets of steel. The external walls are painted with liquid porcelain into which de Waal has inscribed the names of the lost and erased libraries of the world. 
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#EdmunddeWaal #BritishMuseum #libraryofexile #Gagosian @britishmuseum 
#Repost: @edmunddewaal
Edmund de Waal's studio in London, England
#StayHome: Gregory Crewdson’s “Cathedral of the Pines” series was made during three productions in and around the rural town of Becket, Massachusetts. Crewdson photographed figures in the surrounding forests and interior scenes charged with ambiguous narratives that probe tensions between art and life, connection and separation, intimacy and isolation.

Head to “Gagosian Quarterly” to watch a video interview with Crewdson about the series, which he describes as his most intimate and personal body of work. Follow the link in our bio.
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#GregoryCrewdson #GagosianQuarterly #Gagosian @crewdsonstudio
Gregory Crewdson, “The Basement,” 2014 © Gregory Crewdson
#GagosianQuarterly: “In these walls we hear the tender sounds of a girl before she became the voice of a people and a nation still longing to be free.”
—Salamishah Tillet

In a recent “Gagosian Quarterly” feature, Salamishah Tillet reflects on Nina Simone’s enduring legacy, inspired by the acquisition of the musician’s childhood home in Tryon, North Carolina, by artists Ellen Gallagher, Rashid Johnson, Julie Mehretu, and Adam Pendleton.

Tiillet writes about her visit to Simone’s birthplace and describes how the house tells a largely untold story of the singer’s genius, holding the memories and dreams of a family on the move. Read the article via the link in our bio. 
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#NinaSimone #Gagosian 
Nina Simone’s birthplace home, Tryon, North Carolina, 2018. Photos: Scheherazade Tillet
#GagosianQuarterly: “I would go on to believe that mambo was dancing us all toward genuine being, toward becoming ourselves through awareness of others.”
—Robert Farris Thompson

Art historian Robert Farris Thompson has maintained a passion for Afro-Cuban dance and music since experiencing, in 1944, a conga line in his hometown of El Paso. Head to “Gagosian Quarterly” to read a recent feature in which he tracks the spiritual, linguistic, and musical roots of mambo. Follow the link in our bio to read the article online. 
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#Gagosian 
Professional Cuban dancers at the Palladium Ballroom, New York, 1954. Photo: Yale Joel/LIFE Picture Collection via Getty Images
#GagosianQuarterly: “What I love about this whole process is this idea of testing the world—you know, tapping the world.”
—Edmund de Waal

Head to “Gagosian Quarterly” to read a conversation between Edmund de Waal and the composer Simon Fisher Turner. The two discuss their collaboration on the exhibition “–one way or other–“ at the Schindler House in West Hollywood, California, in 2018. Follow the link in our bio to read the piece, or hear an excerpt of the composition.

Over the next few days we will be sharing content on an art form that many of us have turned to in recent weeks: music. Keep an eye out for upcoming posts.
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#EdmunddeWaal #SimonFisherTurner #Gagosian @edmunddewaal
Installation views, “Edmund de Waal: –one way or other –“, Schindler House, West Hollywood, California, September 16, 2018–January 6, 2019. Artwork © Edmund de Waal. Photos: Joshua White/JWPictures.com
#GagosianQuarterly: “Moments like this define us. This is a global human experience that we hope will heighten our empathy and respect for one another. To that end, in the coming weeks we would like to bring you more art and culture than ever before, in the conviction that art has the power to connect us. Each week we will share a new group of articles and videos by and about the artists and creators whose work has long brought us solace, inspiration, and joy.”
—Alison McDonald, Editor-in-chief, Gagosian Quarterly

Today we begin this series with a selection centered on an art form that many of us have been turning to in these days of greater solitude: music. Keep an eye out for upcoming posts. 
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#Gagosian 
Nina Simone at the Globe Jazz festival at Symphony Hall, Boston, March 20, 1986. Photo: John Blanding/Boston Globe via Getty Images
#GagosianQuarterly: "One day around 2000, Robert Therrien received several red-plastic-mold samples in the mail. Over time, the molds attracted other red objects: red sneakers, crayons, fake bricks, fake strawberries. At some point the collection was moved to the room under the stairs, where it continued to grow."
—Alexander Wolf

Head to "Gagosian Quarterly" to read a piece from our Winter 2017 issue about the recurring themes and symbols in the work of the late Robert Therrien. Alexander Wolf describes the artist's studio and tells the story of his "Red Room," a collection of 888 red objects that grew in the room under the staircase. Follow the link in our bio. 
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#Gagosian #RobertTherrien @tate @natgalleriessco (1) Robert Therrien, "Red Room," 2000–07, 888 red objects, housed in the room under the staircase with dutch doors. Collection of Tate and the National Galleries of Scotland; (2) Artist’s pots and pans in the room under the staircase in his studio, Los Angeles. Photos: Josh White/JWPictures
“‘Library of exile,’ which Edmund de Waal has described as the most significant sculpture of his career, consolidates the themes of diaspora, memory and memorial he has returned to throughout his art and writing; but it also serves to reconcile those twin practices.”
—William Atkins, Financial Times

William Atkins recently wrote about Edmund de Waal’s “Library of Exile” for "Financial Times." The library, which went on view earlier this month at London's British Museum, houses over two thousand books written by exiled authors from Ovid’s time to the present day. The external walls of the library are inscribed with a new text piece listing the lost and erased libraries of the world. Inside, embedded in the bookshelves, is a quartet of de Waal’s large-scale vitrines, containing porcelain vessels and page-like brackets of steel. Follow the link in our bio to read the article online.
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#EdmunddeWaal #BritishMuseum #libraryofexile #Gagosian @britishmuseum @financialtimes
#Repost: @edmunddewaal
#DonaldJudd: "Stretching in total 80 feet across and 12 feet up the longest wall at Gagosian, the result is arguably the most communicative, extravagantly available work of Judd's career: a great flutter of planes, columns and edges—the cardinal components of Judd's language—and shifts in light and shadow."
—Roberta Smith, New York Times

The exhibition "Artwork: 1980" at Gagosian, West 21st Street, New York, has been extended through July 11. Follow the link in our bio to read more. 
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#Gagosian #JuddFoundation @juddfoundation @robertasmithnyt @nytimes 
Donald Judd, untitled, 1980 © 2020 Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photos: Rob McKeever
#GagosianQuarterly: "Our life is half natural and half technological. Half-and-half is good."
—Nam June Paik

More than ever before, we are relying on technology to stay connected to the people in our lives. In an article for "Gagosian Quarterly," Alexander Wolf explores the intersection of life and technology as it exists in the work of Nam June Paik, revealing the artist’s ability to balance technological concerns with humanity through music, performance, expressive painting, and images from nature. Read the piece via the link in our bio.
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#NamJunePaik #Gagosian 
Nam June Paik, "Untitled" [Console RCA Victor Deluxe], 1996 © Nam June Paik Estate
#StayHome: Themes of domesticity are often found within Roe Ethridge’s photographs. In "Midwest Long Island" (2018), a small white house, brightly illuminated by the sun, is perched on the horizon.

An exhibition of photographs by Ethridge spanning the past twenty years, titled “Old Fruit,” recently went on view at Gagosian, 976 Madison Avenue, New York. Follow the link in our bio to view more of the artist’s work online.

Keep an eye out for new "Gagosian Quarterly" articles and videos, as well as online artwork presentations, that you can enjoy from home.
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#RoeEthridge #Gagosian @roeethridge
Roe Ethridge, "Midwest Long Island," 2018 © Roe Ethridge
#GagosianQuarterly: Looking for something to watch? Visit "Gagosian Quarterly" to see journalist and curator Judith Benhamou-Huet lead a tour of the exhibition "Urs Fischer: Leo," which was on view at Gagosian, Paris, last year.

The show presented Fischer’s newest candle portrait, which depicts Leonardo DiCaprio with his parents, George DiCaprio and Irmelin Indenbirken. "Leo (George & Irmelin)" melted slowly over the course of the exhibition, serving as both a portrait of—and meditation on—the passing of time. Follow the link in our bio to watch the video.
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#UrsFischer #Gagosian @judithbenhamouhuet 
Installation view, "Urs Fischer: Leo," Gagosian, Paris, October 14–December 20, 2019. Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger
For the April issue of "Frieze," Roe Ethridge was commissioned to take a series of photographs to accompany Tan Lin's "A Brief History of Sweetness in America." In the piece, the poet recalls growing up in Athens, Ohio, with his sister, the artist Maya Lin. Follow the link in our bio now. 
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#RoeEthridge #Gagosian #Frieze @roeethridge @frieze_magazine
Roe Ethridge; (1) "White Rabbit Candy," 2020; (2) "Botan Rice Candy," 2020; (3) "Orange Jelly Candy," 2020; © Roe Ethridge
#GagosianQuarterly: Head to "Gagosian Quarterly" for a behind-the-scenes glimpse of Dan Colen's studio in Brooklyn, New York.

Ben Eastham visited the artist in 2018 while he was preparing for an exhibition at Gagosian, Beverly Hills. The show, "High Noon," presented Colen's "Desert" paintings (2016–18)—lush yet schematic interpretations of stills from Chuck Jones’s animated shorts featuring Wile E. Coyote and the Road Runner. Visit "Gagosian Quarterly" via the link in our bio.
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#DanColen #Gagosian
Dan Colen's studio, Brooklyn, New York, 2018. Artwork © Dan Colen. Photos: Eric Piasecki
#DanColen: In his exhibition "HELP," Dan Colen uses the motif of the message in a bottle—bobbing on an open sea or washed up on a distant shore—to stage the practice of painting as an act of faith, and as a tool for communication with the unknown. Colen looks to the fantasy drama "The Rescuers" (1977). He renders ocean and horizon in bright primary colors, retaining the hard graphic outlines characteristic of the cartoon form while still infusing the paintings’ ripples and waves with a sense of movement. These works were presented for the first time at Gagosian, Park & 75, New York, earlier this year. Learn more via the link in our bio.

With all our galleries temporarily closed, look forward to more images, videos, and editorial to stay connected to our exhibitions online.
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#Gagosian
Dan Colen, "HELP," 2019–20, oil on canvas, 28 × 46 ½ inches (71.1 × 118.1 cm) © Dan Colen.
#GagosianOnline: Mary Weatherford’s 2019 work “Splendor in the Grass” is featured in our Art Basel Hong Kong Online presentation, which closes soon.

Weatherford makes large paintings comprising grounds of spontaneously sponged paint on heavy linen canvases, often surmounted by one or more carefully shaped and placed colored neon tubes. These works expand the expressive potential of neon. Though appropriated by earlier artists for its consumerist and linguistic connotations, in works such as “Splendor in the Grass” the industrial material is transformed into a radically new form of abstract, pictorial drawing.

View our Art Basel Hong Kong Online presentation via the link in our bio. To receive a PDF with detailed information, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com or via DM.
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#MaryWeatherford #Gagosian #ArtBaselOVR @artbasel
Mary Weatherford, "Splendor in the Grass," 2019 © Mary Weatherford
#GagosianOnline: Jia Aili's 2019 painting "Youth and Ultramarine" features in our Art Basel Hong Kong Online presentation, now accessible at gagosian.com/fairs.

A central figure in contemporary art in China, Jia creates dynamic compositions that both emerge from and challenge art historical assumptions in the context of a rapidly changing world. In works such as "Youth and Ultramarine," which move between genre painting, portraiture, fantasy, and abstraction, he reflects on the dramatic modernization of society while probing the vulnerabilities of the existential human condition.

View our Art Basel Hong Kong Online presentation via the link in our bio. To receive a PDF with detailed information, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com or via DM.
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#JiaAili #Gagosian #ArtBaselOVR @artbasel
Jia Aili, "Youth and Ultramarine," 2019 © Jia Aili Studio
#OlivierMosset: Over the past half century, Olivier Mosset has honed a visual language that channels Minimalist and Abstract Expressionist strategies while pursuing an irreverent, self-referential agenda. Often repeating motifs and colors across multiple large canvases, he consciously suppresses subjectivity, symbolism, and metaphor.

In this exhibition, Mosset presents four canvases that are identical in shape and size. The works reward intense scrutiny; at first, all four compositions appear to be painted solid black, yet a closer look reveals almost imperceptibly subtle tonal variations between one work and the next. Follow the link in our bio to read more about the exhibition, which opened at Gagosian, Geneva, earlier this year. 
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#Gagosian 
Installation views, “Olivier Mosset,” Gagosian, Geneva, January 29–April 3, 2020. Artwork © Olivier Mosset. Photos: Annik Wetter
#GagosianOnline: Tetsuya Ishida’s 1996 painting, "Derelict Building Worker’s Chair,” is included in our Art Basel Hong Kong Online presentation, now accessible at gagosian.com/fairs.

Ishida came of age as a painter during Japan’s “lost decade”—a time of nationwide economic recession that lasted through the 1990s. In paintings such as "Derelict Building Worker’s Chair,” Ishida provided vivid allegories of the challenges to Japanese life and morale, charged with a dark Orwellian absurdity.

View our Art Basel Hong Kong Online presentation via the link in our bio. To receive a PDF with detailed information, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com or via DM.
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#TetsuyaIshida #Gagosian #ArtBaselOVR @artbasel 
Tetsuya Ishida, “Derelict Building Worker's Chair,” 1996 © Estate of Tetsuya Ishida
#GagosianOnline: “Kaikai” is one of two sculptures by Takashi Murakami featured in our Art Basel Hong Kong Online presentation, now accessible at gagosian.com/fairs.

The rabbitlike sculpture is presented alongside the three-eyed, smiling “Kiki.” Created between 2018 and 2020, both sculptures are made from fiberglass-reinforced plastic covered in gold leaf. These cute yet imposing characters illustrate Murakami’s interest in paradox, as “kikikaikai” describes something that is dangerous yet appealing.

View our Art Basel Hong Kong Online presentation via the link in our bio. To receive a PDF with detailed information, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com or via DM.
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#TakashiMurakami #Gagosian #ArtBaselOVR @artbasel @takashipom
Takashi Murakami, "Kaikai,” 2018–20 © 2020 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All rights reserved
#GagosianOnline: Georg Baselitz’s 2019 painting "Die andere Seite vom Ölfleck" is featured in our Art Basel Hong Kong Online presentation, now accessible through gagosian.com/fairs.

This new work, from Baselitz’s recent series of gold-on-black paintings, signals a renunciation of corporeality with its repetition of simplified forms to the point of abstraction. For "Die andere Seite vom Ölfleck," the artist did not paint the figures; he painted negative space, in gold paint, then pressed a canvas covered in black paint onto the canvas laid out on the floor.

View our Art Basel Hong Kong Online presentation via the link in our bio. To receive a PDF with detailed information, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com or via DM.
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#GeorgBaselitz #Gagosian #ArtBaselOVR @artbasel
Georg Baselitz, "Die andere Seite vom Ölfleck," 2019 © Georg Baselitz
#DonaldJudd: “Space is made by an artist or architect; it is not found and packaged. It is made by thought.”
—Donald Judd

Measuring eighty feet in width, untitled, 1980, is Donald Judd's largest single work in plywood. Made from Douglas fir, the work consists of a gridded construction in three parts, each section defined by horizontal and diagonal planes. In its fusion of wall- and floor-based formats, the work confirms Judd’s mastery of light and space. It manifests his desire to realize “the simple expression of complex thought,” an idea he considered independent of the Minimalist label to which his work was—to his displeasure—often linked.

This work went on view at Gagosian, West 21st Street, New York, earlier this month. This was the first time the piece had been exhibited in New York since it was originally shown at Castelli Gallery in 1981. Learn more via the link in our bio. 
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#Gagosian #JuddFoundation @juddfoundation 
Donald Judd, untitled, 1980 © 2020 Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Societ
#GagosianOnline: This new painting by Zeng Fanzhi is featured in our Art Basel Hong Kong Online presentation at gagosian.com/fairs.

For the past decade, landscape has been a central focus of Zeng’s art. In his highly tactile scenes, the details of representation often overlap seamlessly with qualities of abstraction, as in certain traditional Chinese aesthetic objects. All are expressionistically rendered with extraordinary attention to the material nuances of the painted surface. Zeng’s fictitious place is at once luminous and bleak—unearthly bursts of vivid color are trapped in snaking brambles that obstruct yet hold the gaze.

View all the artworks presented in Art Basel Hong Kong Online via the link in our bio. To receive a PDF with detailed information, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com or via DM.
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Zeng Fanzhi, "Untitled," 2019 © Zeng Fanzhi Studio
#GagosianOnline: This 2020 painting, "727 Variant," is one of three works by Takashi Murakami currently on view in our Art Basel Hong Kong Online presentation at gagosian.com/fairs.

Since the early 1990s Murakami has invented characters that combine aspects of popular cartoons from Japan, Europe, and the US—from his first Mr. DOB, who sometimes serves as a stand-in for the artist himself, to various anime characters and smiling flowers, bears, and lions. These figures in his works act as icons and symbols—hosts for more complex themes of violence, technology, and fantasy.

View all the artworks presented in Art Basel Hong Kong Online via the link in our bio. To receive a PDF with detailed information, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com or via DM.
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#TakashiMurakami #Gagosian #ArtBaselOVR @artbasel @takashipom
Takashi Murakami, "727 Variant," 2020 © 2020 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All rights reserved
#GagosianQuarterly: Looking for something to read? Head to "Gagosian Quarterly" to learn more about Zeng Fanzhi. Gladys Chung, the editor for the artist’s catalogue raisonné, investigates the first two decades of Zeng’s career. She outlines how these years offer great insights into the artist’s trajectory.

A painting by Zeng is now on view in our Art Basel Hong Kong Online presentation at gagosian.com/fairs. Follow the link in our bio to view the work or read the article online. 
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Zeng Fanzhi with "Hospital Triptych no.1" (1991). Photo: Guo Shaoming
#DuinoElegies: This group exhibition, "Duino Elegies," traces the resonance of Rainer Maria Rilke’s poetry through artworks spanning the past 150 years.

In 1912, Rilke was invited to stay at Duino Castle—a fortress just north of Trieste, Italy. There, while standing atop a cliff overlooking the Adriatic Sea, he claimed to hear the following line: “Who, if I cried out, would hear me among the angelic orders?” Rilke eventually used these words to open the "Duino Elegies," a 1923 collection of ten intensely religious metaphysical poems.

This exhibition went on view earlier this month at Gagosian, 980 Madison Avenue, New York. Follow the link in our bio to view more work from the show online.
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Installation views, "Duino Elegies," Gagosian, 980 Madison Avenue, New York, March 5–April 11, 2020. Artwork, left to right: (1) Medardo Rosso; Paul Cezanne; Auguste Rodin, © Cy Twombly Foundation; © 2020 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; (2) © Cy Twombly Foundation; © 2020 Brice Mar
#GagosianOnline: Tom Wesselmann's "Still Life with Odalisque and Goldfish” is now on view in our Art Basel Hong Kong Online presentation at gagosian.com/fairs.

Throughout the 1990s, Wesselmann expanded upon the two major series that he developed in the 1960s and 1970s: the “Great American Nude” and “Still Life” paintings. “Still Life with Odalisque and Goldfish” (1998–99) intriguingly joins the two series. Here, the classic still life subjects of fruit in a bowl and flowers dominate the background, while a reclining female nude and a goldfish in a bowl of water occupy the foreground.

View the presentation via the link in our bio. To receive a PDF with detailed information on the works, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com or via DM.
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Tom Wesselmann, "Still Life with Odalisque and Goldfish," 1998–99 © The Estate of Tom Wesselmann/Licensed by ARS/VAGA, New York
#GagosianOnline: Takashi Murakami's "Kiki" is one of two large sculptures by the artist featured in our Art Basel Hong Kong Online presentation, now accessible at gagosian.com/fairs.

Created between 2018 and 2020, both the three-eyed, smiling "Kiki" and rabbitlike "Kaikai" are made from fiberglass-reinforced plastic covered in gold leaf. These cute yet imposing characters illustrate Murakami’s interest in paradox, as "kikikaikai" describes something that is dangerous yet appealing.

View all the artworks presented in Art Basel Hong Kong Online via the link in our bio. To receive a PDF with detailed information, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com or via DM.
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#TakashiMurakami #Gagosian #ArtBaselOVR @artbasel @takashipom
Takashi Murakami, "Kiki," 2018–20 © 2020 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All rights reserved
#GagosianQuarterly: Want to see more photographs by Roe Ethridge? Head to "Gagosian Quarterly" to view “Innnocence II,” a photography portfolio by the artist. The images are accompanied by Saul Anton’s "The Story of L.” Follow the link in our bio. 
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Artwork © Roe Ethridge
#RoeEthridge: Since the turn of the century, Roe Ethridge has exercised a significant influence over young artists in particular, yet opportunities to see groupings of his early work have been rare.

This exhibition, “Old Fruit,” focuses primarily on the artist’s output from the early 2000s, offering a valuable chance to revisit many highly regarded and widely reproduced images that embody new ways of understanding the medium of photography in the context of emergent technological and social currents. Follow the link in our bio to view more works from the show online.
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Installation views, "Roe Ethridge: Old Fruit," Gagosian, 976 Madison Avenue, New York, February 26–April 18, 2020. Artwork © Roe Ethridge. Photos: Rob McKeever
#GagosianQuarterly: In a recent feature for “Gagosian Quarterly,” Hans Ulrich Obrist visits Rudolf Polanszky at his studio outside Vienna to discover more about the origins of his practice, his experiments in freedom, and the importance of drifting. Follow the link in our bio to read the article online.
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(1) Rudolf Polanszky in front of his country studio outside Vienna, 2019; (2) Rudolf Polanszky’s studio in Vienna. Artwork © Rudolf Polanszky. Photos: Ealan Wingate
#RudolfPolanszky: In the early 1990s, Rudolf Polanszky turned his attention to the formal potential of sculpture and mixed-media painting with the series “Reconstructions” (1991–). To make these shimmering, richly textured works, he uses salvaged industrial materials such as acrylic glass, aluminum, mirrored foil, resin, silicone, and wire, recombining them into purely aesthetic forms divorced from their original contexts. Polanszky often leaves his raw materials outside, letting the elements help determine the work’s final form.

Polanszky's “Reconstructions” went on view earlier this month at Gagosian, 541 West 24th Street, New York, inaugurating the artist’s representation by the gallery. Follow the link in our bio to learn more about Polansky’s paintings and sculptures. 
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Installation views, “Rudolf Polanszky,” Gagosian, 541 West 24th Street, New York, March 3–April 11, 2020 © Rudolf Polanszky. Photos: Rob McKeever
#GagosianOnline: Art Basel Hong Kong Online is now live! Browse works by Georg Baselitz, Jennifer Guidi, Tetsuya Ishida, Jia Aili, Takashi Murakami, Mary Weatherford, Tom Wesselmann, and Zeng Fanzhi, at gagosian.com/fairs.

The selection of works is simultaneously available on the Art Basel Hong Kong Online Viewing Rooms, accessible through artbasel.com and the Art Basel app.

View the works via the link in our bio. To receive a PDF with detailed information, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com or via DM.
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#Gagosian #ArtBaselOVR @artbasel @tom_wesselmann @takashipom @jenguidi @maryweatherford @zfz_studio 
All artworks copyrighted